NASA Invites Students to Name Next Mars Rover

roverRed rover, red rover, send a name for Mars 2020 right over! NASA is recruiting help from students nationwide to find a name for its next Mars rover mission.

In this image, engineers test cameras on the top of the Mars 2020 rover’s mast and front chassis. The image was taken on July 23, 2019, in the Spacecraft Assembly Facility’s High Bay 1 at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

JPL is building and will manage operations of the Mars 2020 rover for the NASA Science Mission Directorate at the agency’s headquarters in Washington.

The Mars 2020 Rover is preparing to launch to the Red Planet in July 2020, but it doesn’t have a name yet. NASA is asking K-12 students across the United States to send in essays with their best name ideas by Nov. 1.
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Starting Tuesday, K-12 students in U.S. public, private and home schools can enter the Mars 2020 Name the Rover essay contest. One grand prize winner will name the rover and be invited to see the spacecraft launch in July 2020 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

The Name the Rover contest is part of NASA’s efforts to engage students in the STEM enterprise behind Mars exploration and inspire interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

“This naming contest is a wonderful opportunity for our nation’s youth to get involved with NASA’s Moon to Mars missions,” said NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine. “It is an exciting way to engage with a rover that will likely serve as the first leg of a Mars Sample return campaign, collecting and caching core samples from the Martian surface for scientists here on Earth to study for the first time.”

The Mars 2020 rover is a 2,300-pound robotic scientist that will search for signs of past microbial life, characterize the planet’s climate and geology, collect samples for future return to Earth, and pave the way for human exploration of the Red Planet.

“Our Mars 2020 rover has fully taken shape over the past several months, as the project team installed various components onto the chassis: the computer brain and electronics; wheels and mobility system; robotic arm; remote sensing mast; the seven science instruments; and finally, the sample caching system,” said George Tahu, Mars 2020 program executive. “All that’s missing is a great name!”

To enter the contest, students must submit by Nov. 1 their proposed rover name and a short essay, no more than 150 words, explaining why their proposed name should be chosen. The essays will be divided into three groups, by grade level – K-4, 5-8, and 9-12 – and judged on the appropriateness, significance and originality of their proposed name, and the originality and quality of their essay, and/or finalist interview presentation.

Fifty-two semifinalists will be selected per group, each representing their respective state or U.S. territory. Three finalists then will be selected from each group to advance to the final round.

As part of the final selection process, the public will have an opportunity to vote online on the nine finalists in January 2020. NASA plans to announce the selected name on Feb. 18, 2020 – exactly one year before the rover will land on the surface of Mars.

For complete contest and prize details, visit:

https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/participate/name-the-rover/

The naming contest partnership is part of a Space Act Agreement between NASA, Battelle of Columbus, Ohio, and Future Engineers of Burbank, California, in educational and public outreach efforts.

Register to be a Judge

NASA is seeking volunteers to help judge the thousands of contest entries anticipated to pour in from around the country. U.S. residents over 18 years old who are interested in offering approximately five hours of their time to review submissions should register to be a judge at:

https://www.futureengineers.org/registration/judge/nametherover

Rover Update

With all major elements onboard and initial functional checks complete, Mars 2020’s Assembly, Test, and Launch Operations team is preparing the rover and its sky crane descent stage for the next big test: simulating the vibration dynamics of launch and the thermal environment the rover will experience on the surface of Mars.

See NASA’s next Mars rover quite literally coming together inside a clean room at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This behind-the-scenes look at what goes into building and preparing a rover for Mars, including extensive tests in simulated space environments, was captured from March to July 2019. The rover is expected to launch to the Red Planet in summer 2020 and touch down in February 2021.
Source: NASA  Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech
gombt

NASA’s Mars Helicopter Attached to Mars 2020 Rover

rover1

An engineer works on attaching NASA’s Mars Helicopter to the belly of the Mars 2020 rover — which has been flipped over for that purpose — on Aug. 27, 2019, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Engineers attached NASA’s Mars Helicopter, which will be the first aircraft to fly on another planet, to the belly of the Mars 2020 rover today in the High Bay 1 clean room at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

The twin-rotor, solar-powered helicopter was connected, along with the Mars Helicopter Delivery System, to a plate on the rover’s belly that includes a cover to shield the helicopter from debris during entry, descent and landing. The helicopter will remain encapsulated after landing, deploying to the surface once a suitable area to conduct test flights is found at Jezero Crater, the rover’s destination.

The Mars Helicopter is considered a high-risk, high-reward technology demonstration. If the small craft encounters difficulties, the science-gathering of the Mars 2020 mission won’t be impacted. If the helicopter does take flight as designed, future Mars missions could enlist second-generation helicopters to add an aerial dimension to their explorations.

rover2

Members of the NASA Mars Helicopter team attach a thermal film to the exterior of the flight model of the Mars Helicopter. The image was taken on Feb. 1, 2019 inside the Space Simulator, a 25-foot-wide (7.62-meter-wide) vacuum chamber at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

“Our job is to prove that autonomous, controlled flight can be executed in the extremely thin Martian atmosphere,” said JPL’s MiMi Aung, the Mars Helicopter project manager. “Since our helicopter is designed as a flight test of experimental technology, it carries no science instruments. But if we prove powered flight on Mars can work, we look forward to the day when Mars helicopters can play an important role in future explorations of the Red Planet.”

Along with investigating difficult-to-reach destinations such as cliffs, caves and deep craters, they could carry small science instruments or act as scouts for human and robotic explorers. The agency intends to establish a sustained human presence on and around the Moon through NASA’s Artemis lunar exploration plans, using the Moon as a stepping stone to putting humans on Mars.

“The Wright Brothers flew the first airplane at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, but they built it in Dayton,” said NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine. “The Mars Helicopter, destined to be the first aircraft to fly on another world, was built in Pasadena, California. Joined now to the 2020 rover, it is yet another example of how NASA’s Artemis generation is expanding humanity’s reach in our solar system.”

“With this joining of two great spacecraft, I can say definitively that all the pieces are in place for a historic mission of exploration,” said Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator of the Science Mission Directorate at NASA’s headquarters in Washington. “Together, Mars 2020 and the Mars Helicopter will help define the future of science and exploration of the Red Planet for decades to come.”

The Mars 2020 rover, with the Mars Helicopter aboard, will launch on a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket in July 2020 from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. When it lands at Jezero Crater on Feb. 18, 2021, the rover will be the first spacecraft in the history of planetary exploration with the ability to accurately retarget its point of touchdown during the landing sequence.

JPL is building and will manage operations of the Mars 2020 rover and the Mars Helicopter for NASA. NASA’s Launch Services Program, based at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, is responsible for launch management. Lockheed Martin Space provided the Mars Helicopter Delivery System.

To submit your name to travel to Mars with NASA’s 2020 mission and obtain a souvenir boarding pass to the Red Planet, go here by Sept. 30, 2019:

https://go.nasa.gov/Mars2020Pass

For more information about the mission, go to:

https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/

For more information about NASA’s Mars missions, go to:

https://www.nasa.gov/mars

gombv

Robotic Toolkit Added to NASA’s Mars 2020 Rover

rover3

In this August 5, 2019 image, the bit carousel – the heart of sampling and caching subsystem of NASA’s Mars 2020 mission – is attached to the front end of the rover.
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

The bit carousel — a mechanism that will play a key role in the acquisition, containment and eventual return to Earth of humanity’s first samples from another planet — has been incorporated into NASA’s Mars 2020 rover.

“The bit carousel is at the heart of the sampling and caching subsystem,” said Keith Rosette, Mars 2020 sample handling delivery manager at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. “It contains all of the tools the coring drill uses to sample the Martian surface and is the gateway for the samples to move into the rover for assessment and processing.”

Looking somewhat like an extraterrestrial version of a 1960s slide projector, Mars 2020’s bit carousel is home to nine drill bits that facilitate sample acquisition and surface analysis: two for abrading, one for regolith (rock and soil) and six for coring. The coring and regolith bits are used to place Martian samples in a clean sample collection tube, while the abrader bit is used to scrape the top layers of rocks to expose un-weathered surfaces for study.

When the rover team is ready to drill, the carousel whirrs into action. If, for instance, the goal is to abrade, the carousel maneuvers the appropriate bit into position so that the drill at the end of the rover’s robotic arm can extract it. Once the drilling’s done, the bit goes back into the carousel.

rover4

In this image, taken on Aug. 5, 2019, engineers at NASA’s JPL lift the Mars 2020 rover’s bit carousel from its storage container. The bit carousel is at the heart of the rover’s Sample Caching System.
Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech

For core sampling, a sample tube is inserted inside the appropriate bit before the carousel moves the combination into position for the drill. Once the sample tube has been filled, the robotic arm returns the drill bit and tube to the carousel, where they wend their way to processing stations and storage.

“The bit carousel was the last piece of the Mars 2020 rover’s Sample Caching System to be installed,” said JPL’s John McNamee, project manager of Mars 2020. “And while the rover interior is essentially complete — a battery and a camera used during landing are planned in coming weeks — the assembly and test team will not be resting on their laurels. Months of evaluation and fine tuning lie ahead to make absolutely certain this rover is on the launch pad and ready to go on July 17, 2020.”  

Mars 2020 will land on Jezero Crater on Feb. 18, 2021.

JPL is building and will manage operations of the Mars 2020 rover for the NASA Science Mission Directorate at the agency’s headquarters in Washington. NASA will use Mars 2020 and other missions, including to the Moon, to prepare for human exploration of the Red Planet. The agency intends to establish a sustained human presence on and around the Moon by 2028 through NASA’s Artemis lunar exploration plans.

To submit your name to travel to Mars with NASA’s 2020 mission and obtain a souvenir boarding pass to the Red Planet, go here by Sept. 30, 2019:

https://go.nasa.gov/Mars2020Pass

For more information about the mission, go to:

https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/

Source: NASA | DC Agle Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

gombhat

marsjezerocrater

NASA Announces Landing Site for Mars 2020 Rover

gombh

We love ❤️ Mars | We love ❤️ Earth | We love ❤️ Space 

planets,

We love Earth | We love  Mars | We love Space

marsplanet

marsgy

BE A MARTIAN! Living and Working on Mars!

marsplanet

marsotos

SEArch+/Apis Cor of New York won first place in Phase 3: Level 4 in NASA’s 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge

marsplanet

marsmap

marsk

Explore Mars Map

marsplanet

marsmap1

marsmap2

Explore NASA’s Mars Map

Mars Trek is an application that allows you to view imagery and perform analysis on data from the planet Mars.

marsplanet

I don’t think people realise how historically relevant this is. We are hearing wind in another planet for the first time ever! Awesome, I never thought I’d live to hear noise from another planet. I hope we will land there one day. We take this stuff for granted, but now we are listening to the wind on Mars which is nearly 34 million miles away.
gömb

Earth Globe

We love ❤️ Earth | We love ❤️ Mars | We love ❤️ Space

amas8

Save the Planet Earth! Innovations & Future Technology

fold

klima4

Climate Change and Global Warming

fold

future,

Future Cities – Projects Around the World

fold

robotkek

FUTURE TECHNOLOGIES

FUTURE TECHNOLOGIES…. 2025 Coming soon the robot marketing and 3D Internet, hologram shops, robots, cyborgs, responsive tech and wacky self-moulding objects, etc. after the AI….2050.…2100.…fold

future22

Business Development – Innovations & Future Technology

THE FUTURE HAS ARRIVED

Le futur est arrivé — El futuro ha llegado — Die Zukunft ist angekommen

/// We are ready — Nous sommes prêt — Estamos listos — Wir sind bereit ///

cropped-a1.jpg

interenergy

Follow us on:   

https://www.linkedin.com/company/h-mor-aut-h-z-kft-   https://www.xing.com/xbp/pages/intercontact-marketing-network-ltd            Twitter    webtalk      

再見 * Goodbye  *  Adiós * Au revoir  * Adeus * Auf Wiedersehen * До свидания * Arrivederci  * さようなら * Güle güle * Selamat tinggal *  नमस्ते  * Totsiens * Αντίο *  معالسلامة  * Tot ziens * Adiaŭ * Kwaheri * Do widzenia * Viszontlátásra *

 Thank you for viewing!

Mars c25a1-boardingpass

marsfl2

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s